top donate button

Waikato SPCA

Waikato Animal Behaviour Day Emailheader FO

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPCA Animal Behaviour Day

YOU'RE ALL INVITED! We would love all animal lovers and their dogs to join us at our SPCA Animal Behaviour Day at our SPCA Centre. This is an amazing education opportunity to learn from experts about dog and cat behaviour, rehabilitation, hydrotherapy, enrichment for cats and dogs and more. There will also be a doggy creche for your dog to wait with loving volunteers and fresh water whilst you listen in the lectures!

When: Saturday 25 November between 10am and 4pm.

Where: SPCA's Waikato Centre - 47- 49 Northway Street, Te Rapa, Hamilton

Price: $5-$10 donation 

Stalls: Chained Dog Rehabilitation and Rehoming, Bark Bag, Paws4Life Rescue. 

Timetable

10am - Jess Beer (BVSc MANZCV's Veterinary Behaviour, Veterinarion and Director of Kiwi Vet Behaviour): Welcome and introduction to behaviour problems in dogs and cats

11am - Sheree Angela Smith (Hydrotherapist and registered vet nurse. Owner of Kinesis Veterinary - Nutravet NZ Waikato): Introduction to Rehabilitaiton and Hydrotherapy for dogs

11.30am - Pixie Rachael (Mum of Famous Tinkerbelle the Wobble Dog): Introducing Tinkerbelle the amazing story of a resue dog in a wheelchair

12pm - Barbara McDonald: Barb & Legend - All Star Peformance Team. Tricks Display.

12.30 - Public Dog Show. $5 entry fee and prizes to win.

1pm-2pm - Jordan Coulson (CPDT - BS. Certified Profession Dog Trainer and Certified Behaviour Specialist. Owner and Head Trainer at Define Canine Auckland): Discussing dog behaviour and body language. 

2-2.30pm - Jess Beer (BVSc MANZCV's Veterinary Behaviour, Veterinarion and Director of Kiwi Vet Behaviour): Enrichment for dogs and cats

2.30pm - Farah Elnashi (Counselor and dog lover): Discussing the benefits of the human animal bond

3pm - Jess Beer: Your chance to ask anyhting regarding medical, health or behaviour. There will be a box available all day for people to write their questions down which will then be discussed and answered.

4pm - Close and thank you.

waikato header bunnies

SPCA Waikato is a charity that helps protect animals who are sick, injured, lost, abused or simply abandoned. 

As a charity, we rely almost entirely on the generosity of people from Waikato to carry out our life-saving work, as we receive only a small amount of government funding. The majority of our income comes from public donations, bequests and our own fundraising initiatives.

We are the only charity with the power to prosecute people under the Animal Welfare Act 1999.

Our Mission

To advance the welfare of all animals in New Zealand by:

  • Preventing cruelty to animals
  • Alleviating suffering of animals
  • Promoting our policies through education and advocacy

Our Structure

SPCA Waikato is under the control of RNZSPCA.

What We Do

  • Investigate and deal with complaints of cruelty and neglect.
  • Uphold the laws relating to the treatment of animals and take prosecutions where necessary.
  • Give sanctuary to animals in distress.
  • Rehome suitable animals where possible.
  • Ensure that animals which cannot be kept alive for whatever reason are humanely euthaniased.
  • Assist with public education.
  • Promote responsible pet ownership.

Contact Us

Our centre phone line is open every Monday-Saturday between 10.30am and 2.30pm. Out of these hours your call will be transferred to Auckland SPCA where we have an Inspectors who monitor the Waikato region. Our phone number is 07-847-4868. 
  • For stray or barking dogs please call the Waikato District Council for assistance on 0800 492 452.
  • If you have an animal emergency, animal care question, or want to get your pet desexed please contact your local veterinarian for advice and/or support.
  • For after-hours veterinary advice and/or support, please contact Waikato After-hours Veterinary Hospital on 07 839-5656.
  • If you have an animal welfare concern, the Animal Welfare Emergency line is 07-847-4868.
We are open to the public every week day between 10.30am and 2.30pm, and every Saturday between 10.30am and 2.30pm. 

Volunteering and Fostering

If you are interested in becoming a foster parent or volunteering, please fill out the Volunteer Work Application Form and/or the Foster Parent Application Form and send to centremanager@waikatospca.org.nz or post/drop it at our Centre.

We are also looking for a Waikato Events and Community Fundraising Volunteer.

Our new post-box address is PO Box 10576, Te Rapa, Hamilton, 3241.

We really appreciate you wanting to help us out. 

Waikato Opshop

Our SPCA Opshop in Hamilton is located in the Dinsdale Shopping Centre (next to the Countdown)

Opening Hours:

Tuesday -Friday 9.00am - 4.30pm
Saturday 9.00am- 1 .00pm

Our SPCA Opshop in Matamata is 46 Broadway, Matamata.  

Opening Hours:

Monday-Friday 9.00am - 4.00pm

We are looking for any good quality goods donations for our SPCA Opshop and any volunteers who are willing to help out! If you have any sellable goods you would like to donate, or if you are interested in volunteering, please visit our Opshop during these opening hours. 

Animal Care Information

For information about caring for your pet, such as settling in tips, checklists, or introducing your pet to other furry family members click here. 

If you are hoping for some advice on rehoming your pet, click here.

Lost and Found Pets

If you have lost a pet, please click here for more information.

If you believe you have found a lost pet, please click here for more information

Donations

Because the majority of our income comes from public donations, bequests and our own fundraising initiatives, support from people like you mean the world to us. There are two ways you can help us help animals: 

SPCA Waikato FAQ's

Q - What is the new address of SPCA Waikato?

Our address is 47- 49 Northway Street, Te Rapa, and Hamilton.  Our new postal address is PO Box 10576, Te Rapa, Hamilton, 3241. 

Q - What are the opening hours of SPCA Waikato?

We are currently open to the public Monday-Friday from 10.30pm to 2.30pm. Please feel free to visit the Centre between these times or call us on 07 847 4868. The reception does get very busy during these times and calls do not always get answered immediately, so for any non-urgent enquires we do encourage messages be left as we do check the phones very regularly.

We are working very hard to eventually increasing these opening hours and services to include weekends. 

Q – What do I do if I want to lay a complaint concerning the welfare of an animal?

If you wish to lay a complaint about the welfare of an animal(s) please call SPCA Waikato on 07 847 4868.  The initial greeting message directs callers to push option 2 which will redirect the call to the SPCA Contact Centre where the details of your concern will be recorded and allocated to an Animal Welfare Inspector.

Q - What animals are up for adoption?

SPCA Waikato have cats, kittens, rabbits, dogs and puppies for adoption. Cats are $105, kittens are $120, dogs and puppies are $200, and rabbits are $50. All animals come desexed, microchipped, vaccinated, and up to date with flea and worm treatment. If you have any questions on the adoption process please give us a call on 07-847-4868 between 10.30am and 2.30pm.

Q - What is the current status of SPCA Waikato?

Due to financial difficulties, SPCA Waikato closed temporarily to the public in December 2016 pending a review and restructure with a view to enabling the Branch to re-open with a financially sustainable level of service. 

A part of that review included in the local Committee requesting the Centre be taken into voluntary administration by the RNZSPCA National Office and resigning.

On the 18th of January 2017, National Office staff were deployed and with the support of additional personnel from SPCA Auckland, SPCA Tauranga, and SPCA Te Kuiti, the Waikato SPCA Centre is incrementally increasing the breadth of services that can be offered to the community and animals of the Waikato on a sustainable basis as quickly as possible as resources allow.

Under new management the SPCA Waikato Centre has financially stabilised. However, the SPCA is a charity that receives no automatic government funding, so fundraising and community support is essential to long-term success of the Waikato Centre, and to continue to build on progress to date.

Q - What does the future hold for SPCA Waikato?

The future looks bright for SPCA Waikato and all SPCAs’ across New Zealand following the RNZSPCA Annual General Meeting held in Auckland on 17th June 2017. SPCA delegates from around the country voted in favour of the One SPCA proposal which united all of our separate locally governed and financed Centres into one organisation from 1 November 2017

Our previous structure was not sustainable or fit-for-purpose. The One SPCA will strengthen our organisation allowing the SPCA to do more for the vulnerable animals in Waikato and across New Zealand.

As one SPCA we will be able to create a stronger SPCA Inspectorate and we will be able to do more to prevent cruelty to animals through advocacy and education. We will also share our resources to make sure that every vulnerable animal will get the best care the SPCA can provide, no matter where area they are in the country.

As one organisation we will be able to access centralised funding opportunities and benefit from economies of scale – enabling all centres to have the resources to do more for the animals.

We want to assure you that the exciting changes ahead won’t change the focus of SPCA Waikato in any way. Our ongoing purpose is to help animals in need and support our community. And we’ll still need the help of animal lovers like you.

On behalf of the animals, thank you all for your ongoing support of SPCA Waikato.

Q – I’ve lost my animal what should I do?

We advertise all found animals who come into our care on www.petsonthenet.co.nz, Trade Me Lost and Found Animals, and on our Facebook www.facebook.com/WaikatoSPCA. We also advise all those that have found a stray animal to list on those sites too. 

Any animal that comes into our care is scanned for a microchip, so ensure all your details are correct on www.animalregister.co.nz. 

Have a look through the found sections and place a lost ad if no one has posted an ad matching your pet’s description. We also recommend you do a flier drop in your area (we print and deliver 50-90 posters on average when we do this). Go to houses both sides of your house, on both sides of the road, and houses you back on to.

Any animal that comes into our care is scanned for a microchip, so if your pet is microchipped, ensure all your details are correct on www.animalregister.co.nz or phone 0800 LOST PET. 

We also recommend you place a lost ad at your local vet clinic, pet store, dairy and supermarket. 

For more tips, click here.

Q – I have a stray cat hanging around my property. What should I do?

Visit the vets

Take the animal to your local vets and ask them to scan it for a microchip. If the animal is microchipped then they will be able to reunite it with its owner.

Pets on the Net

Check the 'lost' listings and create a 'found' listing at www.petsonthenet.co.nz. This is a national database and the key website we recommend everyone uses.

Create a flyer

Make a flyer with a clear picture, description and your contact details. Distribute it locally via notice boards, mailboxes, neighbours, community centres etc.

Ask the neighbours

Knocking on the door and asking neighbours if they own the animal or if they know who does can speed up the process of reuniting the animal with its owner. Don’t forget to check with the houses behind you too. 

Use social media

Embrace the power of social media to spread the word and try to find the owners. There are plenty of lost and found pages on Facebook that can be used.

Check Trade Me

Look on the Trade Me Lost & Found section to see if anyone is looking for their lost pet. You can also advertise your found animal on here for free.

Q – I have found an abandoned cat, what should I do?

If you have found a healthy cat that you believe may be abandoned, we do have a process that needs to be followed before the cat is accepted in to the Centre.

Cats can travel quite some distance from home. They often go in search of other food sources as well as company when their owners are not around. Although cats can often appear abandoned or lost, more often than not an owner is not far away.

If you call us about a lost or abandoned cat we will provide you with a collar and tag. On the collar and tag we request you write ‘is this your cat please call” and write your phone number.

We will then ask that you return the cat to where you found it, refrain from feeding the cat and remove access to their own cats food.

If after 7 days, and the collar is still on the cat and no owner has come forward (and we have room) the cat may be accepted in to the Centre. Of course, if the welfare of that cat changes within that 7 days we are happy to be called back.

This collar and tagging system has been very successful in locating owners and reducing the number of cats being unnecessarily brought in to a Centre. Many owners are completely unware their cats have wondered as far as they often do.

If the cat is brought in to the Centre we can also scan it for a microchip in the hope of identifying it that way. Again, the same system as described above is implemented and the cat returned to the area it came from pending the collar and tagging process being completed.

Q – There are lots of wild/feral/un-socialised cats hanging around my property, can the SPCA help?

Cat colonies are a huge problem around the Waikato area and in New Zealand. Whilst the Waikato SPCA sympathises with the nuisance they can often create, the trapping and removing of healthy adult cats causing a nuisance is not a service that SPCA Waikato is allocating our limited resources to at this time.

If a member of the public is wishing to take responsibility for the oversight and care of any colony cats and wants assistance with the desexing of these cats please call the Waikato SPCA Centre and speak to the Manager.

It may pay to also seek advice from your local Council. 

Dogs

If you have found a stray dog please contact Animal Control. If the animal is registered then they'll be able to quickly reunite it with it's owner. You may also want to visit your local council animal shelter and check their lost board.

Birds

If you have found a bird please contact Avian Wildlife Rehabiliation Trust on 021-2744256. They cover the Waikato region, and will be able to give you further advice on what to do.

Q – What help is SPCA Waikato able to provide animals in the Waikato community?

The Waikato SPCA can help with any sick, injured, abandoned or vulnerable animals where an owner is unknown or unaware their animal is unwell.  This may include accepting the animal into the Centre, referring the animal to a Vet, deploying the Animal Ambulance or referring the situation to be investigated by an Animal Welfare Inspector.

SPCA Waikato now has a limited ambulance service for to responding to injured or sick animals where an owner is unknown or can’t be located between 10am-4pm Monday-Friday. We hope to extend these hours in the future. 

Q – My pet is injured or sick, what should I do?

Unfortunately SPCA Waikato is unable to assist with owned animals. Please contact your local veterinarian to organise treatment.

Q – How can I help the SPCA Waikato rebuild?

There are lots of ways the community can help. You can volunteer at our Centre or Op Shops. You can become a foster parent, or fundraise and donate.

Volunteer Work Application Form

Foster Parent Application Form

Keep an eye out on our Facebook site for fundraising.

Q – Who is SPCA Waikato’s new Centre Manager?

Laura Vander Kley recently started as SPCA Waikato's new Centre Manager, and positive change has already begun. 

Laura initially became a vet nurse because she wanted to help animals. She spent some time working in a private veterinary practice, but it wasn't until she reached SPCA Auckland as head vet nurse, that she knew the place she could save the most lives was with the SPCA.

After working as head vet nurse at SPCA Auckland for 3 years, she learnt a considerable amount about animal welfare, management, and human relations. So when Laura heard that SPCA Waikato had closed down, she decided to rise to the challenge in helping SPCA Waikato get back to being fully functional again.

Q - What is the new address of SPCA Waikato?

Our address is 47- 49 Northway Street, Te Rapa, and Hamilton.  Our new postal address is PO Box 10576, Te Rapa, Hamilton, 3241.

Q - What are the opening hours of SPCA Waikato?

We are currently open to the public Monday-Friday from 10.30pm to 2.30pm. Please feel free to visit the Centre between these times or call us on 07 847 4868. The reception does get very busy during these times and calls do not always get answered immediately, so for any non-urgent enquires we do encourage messages be left as we do check the phones very regularly.

We are working very hard to eventually increasing these opening hours and services to include weekends.

Q – What do I do if I want to lay a complaint concerning the welfare of an animal?

If you wish to lay a complaint about the welfare of an animal(s) please call SPCA Waikato on 07 847 4868.  The initial greeting message directs callers to push option 2 which will redirect the call to the SPCA Contact Centre where the details of your concern will be recorded and allocated to an Animal Welfare Inspector.

Q - What animals are up for adoption?

SPCA Waikato have cats, kittens, rabbits, dogs and puppies for adoption. Cats are $105, kittens are $120, dogs and puppies are $200, and rabbits are $50. All animals come desexed, microchipped, vaccinated, and up to date with flea and worm treatment. If you have any questions on the adoption process please give us a call on 07-847-4868 between 10.30am and 2.30pm.

Q - What is the current status of SPCA Waikato?

Due to financial difficulties, SPCA Waikato closed temporarily to the public in December 2016 pending a review and restructure with a view to enabling the Branch to re-open with a financially sustainable level of service.

A part of that review included in the local Committee requesting the Branch be taken into voluntary administration by the RNZSPCA National Office and resigning. Full Governance of SPCA Waikato is now undertaken by the RZNSPCA National Office and the RNZSPCA National Board.

On the 18th of January 2017, National Office staff were deployed and with the support of additional personnel from SPCA Auckland, SPCA Tauranga, and SPCA Te Kuiti, the Waikato SPCA is incrementally increasing the breadth of services that can be offered to the community and animals of the Waikato on a sustainable basis as quickly as possible as resources allow.

Under new management SPCA Waikato has finically stabilised however SPCA Waikato is a charity that receives no automatic government funding, so fundraising and community support is essential to long-term success, and to continue to build on progress to date.

 

Q - What does the future hold for SPCA Waikato?

The future looks bright for SPCA Waikato and all SPCAs’ across New Zealand following the RNZSPCA Annual General Meeting held in Auckland on 17th June 2017. SPCA delegates from around the country voted in favour of the One SPCA proposal which will unite all of our separate locally governed and financed Centres into one organisation.

Our previous structure was not sustainable or fit-for-purpose. The One SPCA will strengthen our organisation allowing the SPCA to do more for the vulnerable animals in Waikato and across New Zealand.

As one SPCA we will be able to create a stronger SPCA Inspectorate and we will be able to do more to prevent cruelty to animals through advocacy and education. We will also share our resources to make sure that every vulnerable animal will get the best care the SPCA can provide, no matter where area they are in the country.

As one organisation we will be able to access centralised funding opportunities and benefit from economies of scale – enabling all centres to have the resources to do more for the animals.

We want to assure you that the exciting changes ahead won’t change the focus of SPCA Waikato in any way. Our ongoing purpose is to help animals in need and support our community. And we’ll still need the help of animal lovers like you.

On behalf of the animals, thank you all for your ongoing support of SPCA Waikato.

Q – I’ve lost my animal what should I do?

We advertise all found animals who come into our care on www.petsonthenet.co.nz. Follow the link here: http://bit.ly/WaikatoLostandFound. We also advise all those that have found a stray animal to list on those sites too.

Any animal that comes into our care is scanned for a microchip, so ensure all your details are correct on www.animalregister.co.nz.

Have a look through the found sections and place a lost ad if no one has posted an ad matching your pet’s description. We also recommend you do a flier drop in your area (we print and deliver 50-90 posters on average when we do this). Go to houses both sides of your house, on both sides of the road, and houses you back on to.

Any animal that comes into our care is scanned for a microchip, so if your pet is microchipped, ensure all your details are correct on www.animalregister.co.nz or phone 0800 LOST PET.

We also recommend you place a lost ad at your local vet clinic, pet store, dairy and supermarket.

For more tips, please follow the link: http://www.rnzspca.org.nz/help-advice/lost-an-animal

Best of luck!

Q – I have a stray cat hanging around my property. What should I do?

Ask your neighbours and the properties behind you.

Visit the vets

Take the animal to your local bets and ask them to scan it for a microchip. If the animal is microchipped then they will be able to reunite it with its owner.

Pets on the Net

Check the 'lost' listings and create a 'found' listing at www.petsonthenet.co.nz. This is a national database and the key website we recommend everyone uses.

Create a flyer

Make a flyer with a clear picture, description and your contact details. Distribute it locally via notice boards, mailboxes, neighbours, community centres etc.

Ask the neighbours

Knocking on the door and asking neighbours if they own the animal or if they know who does can speed up the process of reuniting the animal with its owner. Don’t forget to check with the houses behind you too.

Use social media

Embrace the power of social media to spread the word and try to find the owners. There are plenty of lost and found pages on Facebook that can be used.

Check Trade Me

Look on the Trade Me Lost & Found section to see if anyone is looking for their lost pet. You can also advertise your found animal on here for free.

 

Q – I have found an abandoned cat, what should I do?

If you have found a healthy cat that you believe may be abandoned, we do have a process that needs to be followed before the cat is accepted in to the Centre.

Cats can travel quite some distance from home. They often go in search of other food sources as well as company when their owners are not around. Although cats can often appear abandoned or lost, more often than not an owner is not far away.

If you call us about a lost or abandoned cat we will provide you with a place a collar and tag. On the collar and tag we request you write ‘is this your cat please call” and write your phone number.

We will then ask that you return the cat to where you found it, refrain from feeding the cat and remove access to their own cats food.

If after 7 days, and the collar is still on the cat and no owner has come forward (and we have room) the cat may be accepted in to the Centre. Of course, if the welfare of that cat changes within that 7 days we are happy to be called back.

This collar and tagging system has been very successful in locating owners and reducing the number of cats being unnecessarily brought in to a Centre. Many owners are completely unware their cats have wondered as far as they often do.

If the cat is brought in to the Centre we can also scan it for a microchip in the hope of identifying it that way. Again, the same system as described above is implemented and the cat returned to the area it came from pending the collar and tagging process being completed.

Q – There are lots of wild/feral/un-socialised cats hanging around my property, can the SPCA help?

Cat colonies are a huge problem around the Waikato area and in New Zealand. Whilst the Waikato SPCA sympathises with the nuisance they can often create, the trapping and removing of healthy adult cats causing a nuisance is not a service that SPCA Waikato is allocating our limited resources to at this time.

If a member of the public is wishing to take responsibility for the oversight and care of any colony cats and wants assistance with the desexing of these cats please call the Waikato SPCA Centre and speak to the Manager.

It may pay to also seek advice from your local Council.

Dogs

If you have found a stray dog please contact Animal Control. If the animal is registered then they'll be able to quickly reunite it with it's owner. You may also want to visit your local council animal shelter and check their lost board.

Birds

If you have found a bird please contact Bird Rescue who will be able to give you further advice on what to do.

Q – What help is SPCA Waikato able to provide animals in the Waikato community?

The Waikato SPCA can help with any sick, injured, abandoned or vulnerable animals where an owner is unknown or unaware their animal is unwell.  This may include accepting the animal into the Centre, referring the animal to a Vet, deploying the Animal Ambulance or referring the situation to be investigated by an Animal Welfare Inspector.

SPCA Waikato now has a limited ambulance service for to responding to injured or sick animals where an owner is unknown or can’t be located between 10am-4pm Monday-Friday. We hope to extend these hours in the future.

Q – My pet is injured or sick, what should I do?

Unfortunately SPCA Waikato is unable to assist with owned animals. Please contact your local veterinarian to organise treatment.

Q – How can I help the SPCA Waikato rebuild?

There are lots of ways the community can help. You can volunteer at our Centre or Op Shops. You can become a foster parent, or fundraise and donate.

Please find the application forms to become:

A foster parent:

A volunteer:

Keep an eye out on our Facebook site for fundraising, or sign up to our newsletter here to know what is happening.

Q – Who is SPCA Waikato’s new Centre Manager?

Laura Vander Kley recently started as SPCA Waikato's new Centre Manager, and positive change has already begun.

Laura initially became a vet nurse because she wanted to help animals. She spent some time working in a private veterinary practice, but it wasn't until she reached SPCA Auckland as head vet nurse, that she knew the place she could save the most lives was with the SPCA.

After working as head vet nurse at SPCA Auckland for 3 years, she learnt a considerable amount about animal welfare, management, and human relations. So when Laura heard that SPCA Waikato had closed down, she decided to rise to the challenge in helping SPCA Waikato get back to being fully functional again.

She says the most rewarding moments so far have been watching six cat flu kittens grow into healthy kittens who are nearly ready for adoption, and having an amazing volunteer who worked hours repairing donated hutches she organised for the SPCA herself.

"My main goal is to get SPCA Waikato back running to full capacity, using the best welfare standards, and with the support of the community," says Laura.

 

Animals in Emergencies

Animals in Emergenciesanimals in emergencies

If nothing else, recent natural disasters both here in New Zealand and around the world have shown we all need a plan for an emergency or disaster situation.

The same applies to our pets, and we need to have a plan for them. Every home is vulnerable in an emergency, and in homes containing pets, advance preparation for them is as important as it is for other members of your family.

Have a plan

If you have an emergency plan, the chances are you won’t be in the situation many have found themselves in natural disasters worldwide. You would have evacuated early and have been prepared for dealing with your animals.

We want you to take your pet with you should you have to leave your home or the area. Your pet cannot survive without you and you may not be able to return to your property for several days.

Get-away Kit

A get-away kit is a 'grab-and-run' kit, full of items that will allow you to look after your pets in the heat of the moment immediately after a disaster. Ideally you should store this by your back door, or in an easily accessible place.

Your get-away kit should include:
  • Carry boxes for transporting your pets that need it
  • Lead or rope
  • Vaccination, veterinary records, and photographs of your animals
  • A blanket
  • Bottled water
  • A bowl
  • Some food and treats
  • Plastic bags/doggie bags
  • Collar and large name tag, to include the animals name, address and telephone number
  • A first aid kit for animals and a basic animal aid first aid book

In evacuation emergencies such as the New Orleans floods, victims were unable to evacuate with their beloved pets and many chose to remain behind with their animals.

If you have to leave without taking your pet it is essential the animal is microchipped beforehand, as your pet will be a lot easier to locate when you return. The recent Christchurch earthquakes had a very successful relocation rate for animals that were microchipped.

There are three essential steps that you should take in preparation for any emergency:

  • Creat an emergency plan
  • Prepare a get-away kit
  • Prepare a full survival kit, including provisions for your animals

Pet Disaster Survival Kit

Should you have to leave or are in a situation where water, power and food supplies are limited or unavailable, you need to be prepared. This is where a survival kit comes in handy.

You may not be in a position to get it during the initial emergency but you may be able to secure it afterwards, and it may be the crucial difference in the survival of your pet.
  • A pet carrier or crate
  • Pet collar, lead and/or harness
  • Extra rope
  • Extra towels or blankets
  • Another set of pet identification documents – a collar and tag with your contact number, if your pet is not microchipped
  • Enough food and water for seven days
  • Enough medication (if needed) for seven days
  • Extra bowls for food and water
  • A tin opener
  • Photos of your pet
  • Emergency contact list for your local authorities, vet and animal rescue centre
  • Litter tray and litter (for cats)
  • Doggie bags
  • Newspaper
  • Cleaning solution
  • Container to carry everything
  • A first aid kit for animals and a basic animal aid first aid book.


Above all, make sure you and your family are safe, but always remember your pets - they deserve your attention too.

National Rescue Unit

Tile Animal Rescue 5May2016

SPCA's National Rescue Unit (NRU) is comprised of a group of internationally qualified emergency response volunteers who provide a technical rescue service for trapped animals, as well as responding to disasters that may strike. 

Wellington SPCA's Animal Rescue Unit (ARU) comprises of a group of internationally qualified emergency response volunteers who provide a technical rescue service for trapped animals, as well as responding to disasters that may strike.

Wellington SPCA founded the ARU in 1995 and is the only SPCA in New Zealand and Australia to have such a specialist rescue capability, epitomised by the rescue of over 70 animals from the red zone immediately following the 2011 Christchurch earthquake.

Find out more about Wellington's Animal Rescue Unit here

Success Stories

1. SPCA Dannevirke – Tess, the New Belly Dog

tess

Tess was seized from a dire situation by SPCA Inspector Shannon Schofield in June 2014. She had been living in a dirty kennel and had a huge tumour hanging from her underbelly. Tess almost died during the operation to remove the tumour as she was so underweight.

In September 2014, Tess was well enough to go to the SPCA. She got a bath and a fancy new haircut and went to live with SPCA volunteer Jayne. Tess hadn't been spayed during her first operation as the risk was too high, and subsequently she got an infected uterus and almost died again. When she was finally able to be spayed, we discovered more tumours during operation.

The transformation of this poor dog has been amazing. She spent the first part of her life on a chain and now has a loving family home where she is even allowed on the couch. “Tess came to her first St Francis day on Sunday, and the smile on her face brought tears to my eyes,” said SPCA Inspector Shannon Schofield.

A word from mum Jayne: “She sleeps with her white toy cat at night on the couch. I very often find her asleep with her head resting on it. She's very attached to me and follows me like a shadow. As soon as I sit down, she's right up close and nestles in close to me. At dinner time she eats her food so fast it's as if it's her last meal. I guess it will take time for her to realise that being starved is a thing of the past. She is very intense, and needing lots of nurturing. I love her dearly.”

 

2. SPCA South Taranaki – Ben, the Rest Home Cat

ben

Ben was a stray cat who had been living under someone's house for two weeks. When he arrived at SPCA South Taranaki, his coat was dirty, he had a large cat bite abscess on his leg, and he was underweight and had not been neutered. Ben had obviously been living the rough life of a Tom cat before he was rescued by SPCA Inspector Shannon Schofield.

After treatment for his abscess, Ben was neutered and fed a healthy diet. He soon became a confident, cuddly cat. As no owner came forward to claim Ben, he was put up for adoption.

About this time, local rest home and hospital Trinity contacted us seeking a male cat that was easy care and well-adjusted to be social in a hospital setting. Based on our time with him, this was right up Ben's alley and he was donated to Trinity's hospital wing.

A couple of months later, we received a photo and note from the staff at Trinity. There was Ben, curled up on the lap of Mavis who was 101-years-old.

“It warmed my heart to see the impact the SPCA can have on both animal and human quality of life,” said SPCA Inspector Shannon Schofield. “I have since framed this picture and hung it in my office to remind me on the bad days the good that comes from working at the SPCA.”

 

3. SPCA New Plymouth – Baxter, the Bubbly Kitten

baxter
In 2012, SPCA New Plymouth started to get phone calls from people who had spotted an adorable, ginger kitten living at an isolated rest area at the top of Mt Messenger, one hour north of New Plymouth. He would appear tantalisingly close to those who stopped, but always just out of reach.

The calls came from all over New Zealand from travellers who had seen this delightful little guy. And what made the story even more special was that he appeared to be living with two roosters. He didn't respond to the call, 'puss, puss', only to the call, 'chook, chook, chook!'

Three trips to the top of Mt Messenger by SPCA Inspector Bob Heslop were to no avail – Baxter didn't even show his face. But the calls kept coming. Finally, a breakthrough – a family who lived nearby were contacted and it was discovered that they had been feeding Baxter and could almost touch him. Another trip North was arranged, and this time a joint effort from the family and the SPCA (aided by food and a large net) resulted in one captured kitten. In less than an hour, Baxter was responding to possibly the first ever kind human touch he had received.

The last touch he had felt were the hands that threw him from a car – and he wasn't alone. Over a distance of about 20km, Baxter's wee siblings had also been abandoned. Whoever did this did not even have the heart to leave the wee kittens together. Thankfully, two other kittens were rescued by locals.

We can only hope that his mum ended up somewhere safe. She may have already come to the SPCA and been sent on her way to a loving, new home – no longer able to have kittens, yet full of hope for a new life.

Because of the people who cared enough to tell us about Baxter and the wonderful family who fed and encouraged him to trust people again, Baxter survived and is now a very contented and well-loved cat. After recovering at the SPCA, he was adopted by that same wonderful family who played such a big part in his rescue.

 

4. SPCA Whangarei – Brutus, the 'Bomb' Dog

brutus“When I first met Brutus, he was a tiny, 4-week-old waif who had been abandoned at a local service station,” said SPCA Inspector Helena Sweeting. “'You poor little thing,' I thought. 'I'm going to take you home and see if I can fix you.'”

With a lot of love and care (and the mothering of Helena's older dog, Sinsa), Brutus thrived and grew into a beautiful, healthy, young dog. He visited SPCA Whangarei every day to try to find his forever home, but nobody ever chose him. It began to look as though he'd be with the SPCA forever.

But Brutus was very intelligent and obsessed with toys, so Helena decided to get in touch with New Zealand Detector Dogs (NZDD) to see if he could become a drug or Customs dog. NZDD did an initial assessment and Brutus flew through it. The next step was to be assessed by NZDD handler and trainer Guus Knopers. When Guus visited the SPCA, he knew within minutes that Brutus was the kind of dog they needed in the Bomb Detection Unit.

Brutus was put through training (including scent detection and obedience) and passed with flying colours. Guus said he was in the top 5% of dogs he had ever trained. He has now flown off on the next chapter of his journey.

“It was a very happy/sad moment for me seeing him go,” said Helena, “knowing that his new life will be exciting but also may be dangerous, so proud that what he does will save lives. He had become such a part of my family. I do miss him.”

 

5. SPCA Whangarei – Heady, the Brown Shaver Hen

headyOn 28 March, 2014, a member of the public brought a brown shaver hen into SPCA Whangarei. She had a large injury to her head and comb area. There were no feathers or skin remaining on her head, and her skull was visible.

Heady was in otherwise okay condition – a little thin, but very friendly and talkative. She had been a stray in the area for about a week. The SPCA team were unsure what caused the injury, but applied diluted iodine to her head twice a day over the many months it took to heal. The skin finally grew over her skull but unfortunately her feathers never regrew.

During her recuperation, our staff fell in love with her. Heady now lives at SPCA Whangarei as part of the Education Crew. She helps with the school holiday programme, and has participated in our Annual Street Appeal and the local A&P Show.

 

6. SPCA North Taranaki – Willow, the Surfer Cat

willow

On a visit from Australia, the Allerton family were walking down the beach when they saw something just on the edge of the waves. They realised it was an animal but before they could reach it a wave swept it away. Rushing into the water, Niki Allerton managed to rescue a tiny kitten.

“I picked her up and put her down my top,” said Jane Allerton. “She was just a skeleton covered in fur.”

The kitten was probably 6 weeks old, but looked more the size of a 3 week old.

Originally, Niki and Jane had called the kitten Wilson. The kitten's name was changed to Willow when it was revealed that he was actually a she. SPCA North Taranaki took Willow in, bottle fed her and transferred her into temporary foster care with one of their very dedicated Inspectors.

Willow thrived, and when the Allerton's moved back to New Zealand from Australia they adopted her. This photo of Willow with Jane and her daughter Chloe (3) says it all.

(Photo from North Taranaki Midweek/Stuff.co.nz, 2014)

 

7. SPCA Tauranga – Del, the Rescued Puppy

del
SPCA Inspector Jason Blair received an emergency call from the police to rescue an 8 week old puppy who had been struck by its owner.

Del was small and helpless, and without the assistance from the New Zealand Police and SPCA Tauranga, his future would have been very bleak indeed.

Del received vet treatment for his injuries and was then transferred to a foster home to heal. Once recovered, he returned to the SPCA to find a loving forever home. Del was about three and a half months old when he was adopted. He now has a family who treat him with the respect and kindness that he truly deserves.

Del's previous owner was fined $1,500 and disqualified from owning an animal for 5 years.

 

8. SPCA Whangarei – Kali, the Wild Cat

kali
Sage was brought to SPCA Whangarei in a horrendous, homemade cat trap. The neighbours had been trapping a local colony of stray cats and bringing them to the SPCA.

When she arrived, Sage was a scared, 15 week old kitten. She settled in after a couple of weeks, but was still a bit timid and didn't like fast movements or a lot of noise. The SPCA team moved her into the cattery to see if her behaviour would improve. After two weeks in the cattery, Sage found her new family. They had a quiet home and were prepared to be patient with her.

The SPCA finds it very hard to find homes to suit scared, timid cats, so Sage's story is a unique one.

Below is a letter we received from Sage to her new owners, Julie and Barry.

“You adopted me on 14 August and at that time, I was known as Sage, and was a 'no expressions of interest' kitten, as I wasn't very well socialised. A lot has changed in the last few weeks. I now have a new name - Kali, which is the name of a wild goddess who represents 'change and transformation', and also the divine feminine. My name is appropriate in many ways, as I was certainly pretty wild when you took me home.

“The first two days I didn't use the little green sanctuary box you provided me with, but hid in the darkest corner underneath the 'L' shaped lounge suite, which meant no-one could come near me. But you outwitted me by taking the furniture out of the room, making me retreat to my box, where Julie could then reach in and pat me. At first I just hissed and scratched you but after a couple more days, despite myself, I started to purr. Another day or two later I decided to risk coming out of the box a little bit, then slowly ventured further into the room, and then over a few weeks I went room by room and got to know the whole house.

“I'm now comfortable everywhere inside, including the garage. I've also become used to visitors, although I usually hide in my secret hiding place that no one knows about behind the bookcase until I feel safe again. I also hide when no one else is at home, as I don't feel big enough to be on my own just yet.”

 

9. SPCA Bay of Islands – Maddie, the Mystery Bay Filly

maddie
A call from a member of the public resulted in a two-hour trip by SPCA Inspector Wendy Locke to pick up a distressed bay filly. She was only two days old and was severely malnourished.

With the filly in the back of her truck, Wendy made her way back to Bay of Islands Vets just before closing time. She picked up bottles and milk powder, and turned her laundry into an emergency stable.

Wendy named the filly Maddie and settled in for a very long night of feeding every 1.5 hours. The following day, the local vet concluded that Maddie was in great shape considering what she had been through, so SPCA Bay of Islands set to work to try to find Maddie a foster home.

Thanks to the Northland 'grapevine', we soon found a local lady who had a mare that could possibly take Maddie. We were delighted when the mare accepted Maddie and Maddie finally figured out what to do to get milk.

A perfect match. With Maddie at home with a new mum, Wendy was looking forward to a good night's sleep some 39 hours later.

 

Without your generous support, we wouldn't be able to give these animals the lives they deserve.

 

donate-box  
Click here to access our secure online donation form  

National Animal Welfare Policy

Our National Animal Welfare Policy outlines our stance on key areas of animal welfare. The SPCA has, as its basis, the philosophy that all animals are equally deserving of our compassionate consideration, whether they be a dog left tied up and neglected in a backyard or a possum chewing through our native forests.

To download a copy of our Policy, please click here.

The 5 Freedoms

Five Freedoms

The 5 freedoms are a set of internationally-recognised animal welfare standards. They outline what we as animal owners and carers must provide. They are not just things we want to do for our animals, but also things we must do in order to be responsible owners.

The 5 freedoms are:

1. Freedom from hunger and thirst (food and water)

All animals deserve access to clean water and a well-balanced, nutritious diet. Freedom from hunger and thirst provides for animals most basic needs by allowing that animal to remain in good health and full of vitality.

2. Freedom from discomfort (shelter)

All animals should live in an appropriate environment. The conditions and surroundings given to an animal contribute to its overall well-being. By providing an animal with shelter and a comfortable resting area, you are ensuring that the animal remains healthy and happy.

3. Freedom from pain, injury and disease (medical care)

All animals should be entitled to immediate veterinary attention when sick or injured to avoid unnecessary suffering. In certain cases, unneccesary pain and injury can be prevented through regular visits to a vet.

4. Freedom to express normal behaviour (exercise)

All animals should be allowed to express normal behaviours. A normal behaviour is the way an animal acts in its natural environment. Enough space, proper shelter and housing as well as adequate exercise, opportunity to play and the company of the animal's own kind encourages the expression of normal behaviours.

5. Freedom from fear and distress (love and understanding)

All animals deserve to be happy. Ensuring conditions that avoid unnecessary anxiety and stress will help to provide freedom from mental suffering. While favourable physical conditions are essential, appropriate mental conditions are also important to good animal welfare.


Of course, no freedom is enough in isolation and as such we must provide our animals with the 5 freedoms all the time, so they can live happy and healthy lives.

 

Animal Welfare Act 1999

The 5 freedoms are also an important part of the Animal Welfare Act 1999 which is enforced by SPCA Inspectors in the community. They are often the first things our Inspectors look for when they visit a property after receiving an animal welfare complaint. If they find that the animals are not receiving these needs, they will try and work with the owners to help them understand their obligations, and help improve the lives of the animals.

If the situation is very serious they may need to remove the animals from the property, and in cases of abuse proceed with a prosecution.

  • 1
  • 2